Friday, December 31, 2010

Live@edu

A free suite of hosted Microsoft services and applications which provides education institutions with a set of hosted collaboration services, communication tools, and mobile, desktop, and web-based applications, as well as data storage capabilities:


Live@edu (website: http://my.liveatedu.com)

Live@edu is a no-cost hosted platform for student communication and collaboration, providing industry-leading services to the global education market. E-mail and calendars with a 10GB inbox, 25GB of additional file storage, document sharing, instant messaging, video chat and mobile e-mail are just part of the feature set. Live@edu provides students with the professional tools to prepare them for college or work from day one. Live@edu is accessible through popular Web browsers for Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems — and easy to set up, administer and manage. More than 10,000 schools in more than 130 countries have enrolled in Live@edu, serving tens of millions of students worldwide. More information is available at http://www.microsoft.com/liveatedu (source: Microsoft News Center: State University of New York Moves to Microsoft’s Cloud).


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Fars Province

A province of Iran known as the Cultural Capital of Iran:


Fars Province


The center of the Fars Province is Shiraz; Shiraz is known as the city of poets and flowers (one of the must-see cities in the world).

Fars Province - Iran

Several beautiful counties in the Middle East are located in the Fars Province. One of them, known for its natural views and moderate climate, is the Bavanat County.

Bavanat County - Fars Province - Iran

Bavanat County - Fars Province - Iran

The ancient Persians were present in the region from about the 9th century BC, and became the rulers of a large empire under the Achaemenid dynasty in the 6th century BC. The ruins of Persepolis and Pasargadae, two of the four capitals of the Achaemenid Empire, are located in Fars (source: Absolute Astronomy).

The ruins of Persepolis - Fars Province - Iran

Pasargadae, in the Fars Province, was the capital of Cyrus the Great (559-530 BC) and also his last resting place, was a city in ancient Persia, and is today an archaeological site and one of Iran's UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Pasargadae, Tomb of Cyrus the Great - Fars Province - Iran

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Arabian Desert

A vast desert wilderness stretching from Yemen to the Persian Gulf and Oman to Jordan and Iraq:


Arabian Desert (or Eastern Desert)


Arabian Desert

The Arabian Desert occupies most of the Arabian Peninsula with an area of 2,330,000 square kilometers.

Arabian Desert

The Arabian Desert is one of the most continuous bodies of sand in the world.

Arabian Desert

At least one-third of the desert is covered by sand, including the Rubʿ al-Khali, considered to have one of the most inhospitable climates on Earth. There are no perennial bodies of water, though the Tigris-Euphrates river system lies to the northeast and the Wadi Ḥajr is located to the south, in Yemen. Humans have inhabited the area since Pleistocene times (source: Britannica).

Arabian Desert

The Arabian Desert is third-largest desert in the world.

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Taurus Mountains

A mountain complex in southern Turkey, from which the Euphrates and Tigris descend into Iraq:


Taurus Mountains

Taurus Mountains

Ethnoreligious

An ethnic group of people whose members are also unified by a common religious background:


Ethnoreligious Group

OpenLeaks

Former WikiLeaks staff open new whistle-blower leak service called:


OpenLeaks

The former number two at Wikileaks, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, launches the next-generation of leaking software called Openleaks, and he will try to fix some of the problems associated with the Wikileaks model, namely centralization. Openleaks will be a conduit of information rather than a publisher of information.

OpenLeaks (Image: openleaks.org)

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Cape Verde

An island country, spanning an archipelago of 10 islands located in the central Atlantic Ocean, 570 kilometres off the coast of Western Africa:


Cape Verde

Cape Verde Flag

Cape Verde

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

wikiHow

A wiki-based community, consisting of the world's largest and highest quality how-to manuals:



wikiHow


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Monday, December 13, 2010

Dielectric Heating

The process in which radio wave or microwave electromagnetic radiation heats a dielectric material:



Dielectric Heating (also called RF Heating, High-Frequency Heating, or Electronic Heating)

Note: Microwave ovens use dielectric heating to cook food.

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Dielectric

An electrical insulator that may be polarized by an applied electric field:



Dielectric

If a dielectric is placed in an electric field then the electric charges do not flow through the material; however, slightly shift from their average equilibrium positions causing dielectric polarization.

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Electronegativity

A chemical property that describes the tendency of an atom or a functional group to attract electrons or electrons' density towards itself and thus the tendency to form negative ions:



Electronegativity

Rem: In organic chemistry, a functional group is a specific group of atoms within molecules that are responsible for the characteristic chemical reactions of those molecules.

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Paleolithic Architecture

From 39,000 to 8,000 B.C., the architecture formed by the earliest buildings which were natural caves sometimes with animal skins, thatch, or mud:



Paleolithic Architecture

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Thursday, December 9, 2010

Hippocampus

A major component of the brains of humans and other mammals, located in the medial temporal lobe of the brain, which plays important roles in long-term memory and spatial navigation:



Hippocampus


The hippocampus plays a vital role in enhancing memory in those who are actively engaged in learning something new. It coordinates with other brain structures to accomplish different tasks, such as recognizing an object one has seen before or remembering its original location (Read more here).

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Improve Your Memory (Level 1 of 3)

Improve Your Memory (Level 1 of 3)

Improve Your Memory (Level 1 of 3) [Kindle Edition]

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Kelp Forest

Underwater area with a high density of large seaweeds or algae, recognized as one of the most productive and dynamic ecosystems on Earth:



Kelp Forest

Note: Smaller areas of anchored kelp are called kelp beds.

Kelp Forest
Kelp Forest


The kelp forests off southern California are considered to be some of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on the planet, yet a new study indicates that today's kelp beds are less extensive and lush than those in the recent past.

The kelp forest tripled in size from the peak of glaciation 20,000 years ago to about 7,500 years ago, then shrank by up to 70 percent to present day levels, according to the study by Rick Grosberg, professor in the Department of Evolution and Ecology and the Center for Population Biology at UC Davis, with Michael Graham of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory and Brian Kinlan at UC Santa Barbara [Read more here].

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Cerebral Achromatopsia

A type of color-blindness, caused by damage to the cerebral cortex of the brain (and not the abnormalities in the cells of the eye's retina), that most of its patients describe seeing the world in shades of gray:



Cerebral Achromatopsia

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Mauritania

An Islamic Republic in North Africa bordered by the Atlantic Ocean in the west, by Western Sahara in the north, by Algeria in the northeast, by Mali in the east and southeast, and by Senegal in the southwest:



Mauritania

Background (Source: CIA, The World Factbook, Mauritania):
Independent from France in 1960, Mauritania annexed the southern third of the former Spanish Sahara (now Western Sahara) in 1976 but relinquished it after three years of raids by the Polisario guerrilla front seeking independence for the territory. Maaouya Ould Sid Ahmed TAYA seized power in a coup in 1984 and ruled Mauritania with a heavy hand for more than two decades. A series of presidential elections that he held were widely seen as flawed. A bloodless coup in August 2005 deposed President TAYA and ushered in a military council that oversaw a transition to democratic rule. Independent candidate Sidi Ould Cheikh ABDALLAHI was inaugurated in April 2007 as Mauritania's first freely and fairly elected president. His term ended prematurely in August 2008 when a military junta led by General Mohamed Ould Abdel AZIZ deposed him and ushered in a military council government. AZIZ was subsequently elected president in July 2009. The country continues to experience ethnic tensions among its black population (Afro-Mauritanians) and white and black Moor (Arab-Berber) communities, and is having to confront a growing terrorism threat by al-Qa'ida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM).

Mauritania

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Sunspot

The temporary phenomena on the photosphere of the Sun that appear visibly as small dark points:



Sunspot

Sunspot

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Photosphere

The imaginary surface from which the solar light being seen appears to be emitted:



Photosphere

The photosphere is the visible surface of the Sun that we are most familiar with. Since the Sun is a ball of gas, this is not a solid surface but is actually a layer about 100 km thick (very, very, thin compared to the 700,000 km radius of the Sun). When we look at the center of the disk of the Sun we look straight in and see somewhat hotter and brighter regions. When we look at the limb, or edge, of the solar disk we see light that has taken a slanting path through this layer and we only see through the upper, cooler and dimmer regions. This explains the "limb darkening" that appears as a darkening of the solar disk near the limb.

Photosphere

Source: NASA, Solar Physics, The Photosphere.

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Dermatitis

Inflammation of the skin which usually involves swollen, reddened and itchy skin:



Dermatitis

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Sunday, November 28, 2010

Dominic O'Brien

British mnemonist who is the eight time world memory champion:



Dominic O'Brien

Dominic O'Brien (1957- ) is a British mnemonist and an author of memory related books. He is the eight time world memory champion and works as a trainer for Peak Performance Training.

He began developing his mnemonic techniques when he saw Creighton Carvello memorize a pack of 52 playing cards in less than three minutes. He has written books about memorization techniques such as ‘How to Develop a Perfect Memory’, ‘Quantum Memory Power’, ‘Learn to Remember’, ‘How to Pass Exams’, ‘The Winning Hand’, and ‘The Amazing Memory Box’.

Dominic O'Brien

He gives lectures, and has been seen on television programmes such as The Human Body.

Dominic O'Brien had an entry in the Guinness Book of Records for his May 1, 2002 feat of committing to memory a random sequence of 2808 playing cards (54 packs) after looking at each card only once. He was able to correctly recite their order, making only eight errors, four of which he immediately corrected when told he was wrong.

Source: Wikipedia.org: Dominic O'Brien

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Mnemonist

Someone with the ability to remember and recall unusually huge amount of information and/or data:



Mnemonist

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Francisco Franco

A Spanish military general and head of state of Spain from 1936, and de facto regent of the nominally restored Kingdom of Spain from 1947 until his death in 1975:



Franco (Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco)

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Sunday, November 21, 2010

Nazanin Afshin-Jam

Miss World Canada in 2003 and Miss World 1st runner up, an Iranian-Canadian Human Rights Activist, President and Co-Founder of Stop Child Executions:



Nazanin Afshin-Jam

Read more on wikipedia.
Nazanin's Website: http://www.nazaninafshinjam.com/
Nazanin's Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nazanin-Afshin-Jam-Official-page/42663934158


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Deimos

The smaller and outer of the two moons of Mars:



Deimos

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Phobos

The larger and closer of the two moons of Mars:



Phobos

Phobos' orbital radius is decreasing, so it will eventually impact the surface of Mars or break up into a planetary ring.

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Friday, November 19, 2010

Einsteinium

On the periodic table, the element represented by the symbol Es and atomic number 99:


Einsteinium

Einsteinium is discovered in the debris of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952, and named after Albert Einstein.

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Kodiak Island

The second largest island in the United States:


Kodiak Island

Rem: The largest US island is the Island of Hawaiʻi, also called the Big Island or Hawaiʻi Island.

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Thursday, November 18, 2010

Bombardier

A beetle which ejects a noxious chemical spray in a rapid burst of pulses from special glands in its abdomen with a popping sound:


Bombardier Beetle


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Prodrome

An early symptom that might indicate the start of a disease before specific symptoms occur:


Prodrome

For example fever frequently occur in the prodrome of many infective disorders.

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Pathophysiology

The branch of medicine which deals with any disturbances of body functions, caused by disease or prodromal symptoms:


Pathophysiology

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Pint

An English unit of volume or capacity in both the imperial system and in United States customary units; in the imperial system, it is about 568 ml, and in the U.S. version is about 473 ml:


Pint

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Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Learn by Word Scramble Puzzles

Review the recent 30 posts and then try to solve the following Word Scramble Puzzles; in this way, you can memorize them easier and "Improve Your General Knowledge in Leisure Time!"

1) A unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules which is approximately the amount of energy needed to heat 1 pound of water for 1° Fahrenheit:

TBU

2) The Scots word for the last day of the year which is synonymous with the celebration of the New Year (Gregorian calendar) in the Scottish manner:

gomhayna

3) Karoshi is a Japanese word which means:

athbwdeoyokevrr

4) Energetic particles, originating from outer space, which impinge on Earth's atmosphere:

iccosaymr

5) The indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand:

iaomr

6) The use and effects of drugs on large groups of people:

oiiepdeomolgyharmapc

7) An important trade route between Central Asia and South Asia; a strategic military location, that is a mountain pass which links Pakistan and Afghanistan:

shybskaepr

8) A part of the mind which gives rise to a collection of mental phenomena that manifest in a person's mind but which the person is not aware of at the time of their occurrence:

usnmcdoniuscion

9) A psychological attempt by an individual to repel its own desires and impulses towards pleasurable instincts:

logioicalnsspprrseehoyc

10) A social movement and provocative women’s movement in Ukraine, founded in 2008 which became internationally known for going topless to protest against sex tourists, sexism and other social ills:

MEENF

11) The process of converting a word or a phrase of any other language into a more comprehensible English form for English speakers:

ngltiizonaica

12) A criminal activity involving robbery by groups of armed bandits:

itcoyda

13) A scientific research strategy, often used in anthropology and in some branches of sociology, for gathering empirical data on human societies and cultures by participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, etc.:

ngroyapethh

14) A method of inquiry about exploring issues, understanding phenomena, and answering questions; appropriated in many different academic disciplines, such as social sciences, market research, marketing research, etc., which seeks out "why" and not "how" of its topics through the analysis of unstructured information collected by interviews, questionnaires, surveys, observation, etc.:

alrequitchasetivare

15) A systematic qualitative research methodology in the social sciences emphasizing generation of theory from data in the process of conducting research:

dedeogroutryhn

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Answers:

1) BTU
2) Hogmanay
3) Death by Overwork
4) Cosmic Ray
5) Maori
6) Pharmacoepidemiology
7) Khyber Pass
8) Unconscious Mind
9) Psychological Repression
10) FEMEN
11) Anglicization
12) Dacoity
13) Ethnography
14) Qualitative Research
15) Grounded Theory

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Sunday, November 14, 2010

Grounded Theory

A systematic qualitative research methodology in the social sciences emphasizing generation of theory from data in the process of conducting research:


Grounded Theory

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Qualitative Research

A method of inquiry about exploring issues, understanding phenomena, and answering questions; appropriated in many different academic disciplines, such as social sciences, market research, marketing research, etc., which seeks out "why" and not "how" of its topics through the analysis of unstructured information collected by interviews, questionnaires, surveys, observation, etc.:


Qualitative Research

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Saturday, November 13, 2010

Organizational Storytelling

The discipline in the fields of management, strategy and organization studies which attempts to recount events in the form of a story within the context of an organization:


Organizational Storytelling (also known as Narrative Knowledge)

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Ethnography

A scientific research strategy, often used in anthropology and in some branches of sociology, for gathering empirical data on human societies and cultures by participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, etc.:


Ethnography

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File Shadowing

Providing an exact copy or mirror of a file or a set of data:


File Shadowing

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Hologram

For a complex object, a laser beam is first split into two separate beams of light using a silver mirror (half-silvered glass) or a birefringent material, then one beam illuminates the object and the second beam illuminates the recording medium; this process is done to record a:

Hologram

CNN Hologram TV
video

Creating a Star Wars-esque hologram scene

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Now on Amazon Kindle:
Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader?

Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader?

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Hungary

The country which is called Magyarország by its native speakers:


Hungary

Hungary Flag

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Thursday, November 11, 2010

Dacoity

A criminal activity involving robbery by groups of armed bandits:

Dacoity

The word Dacoity is the anglicized version of the Indian word ḍakaitī (Hindi डकैती, Urdu ڈکیتی or Bangla ডাকাতি) which comes from ḍākū (Hindi: डाकू, Urdu: ڈاکو, meaning "armed robber") or Bangla ḍakat (ডাকাত). [Read more here.]

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Anglicization

The process of converting a word or a phrase of any other language into a more comprehensible English form for English speakers:


Anglicization

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A Cappella

Solo music or group vocal or singing without instrumental sound, or a piece intended to be performed in this way:

A Cappella (also Acapella or A Capella)

Peter Christian Lutkin, Dean of the Northwestern University School of Music, helped popularize a cappella music in the United States by founding the Northwestern A Cappella Choir in 1906. The A Cappella Choir was "the first permanent organization of its kind in America" [1][2].

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References:
[1] Northwestern University, Guide to the Peter Christian Lutkin Papers, Biography.
[2] Leonard Van Camp, The Formation of A Cappella Choirs at Northwestern University, St. Olaf College, and Westminster College, Journal of Research in Music Education, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Winter, 1965), pp. 227-238.

FEMEN

A social movement and provocative women’s movement in Ukraine, founded in 2008 which became internationally known for going topless to protest against sex tourists, sexism and other social ills:


Recent News:
[ 1 ] Anniversary FEMEN Spain. Congratulations!
[ 2 ] FEMEN disrupt Muslim conference in France, get kicked
 


FEMEN

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In the News

Stop the stoning: Outside the Iranian embassy in Kiev, FEMEN activists shout, cry and boogaloo in protest of the death-by-stoning sentence given to Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, mother of two children and convicted adulterer in Iran. FEMEN is the Ukrainian women's movement [source: San Francisco Chronicle].

Ukrainian female activists attack Iran's embassy in Kiev [source: tert.am]


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Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Psychoanalysis

The ideas developed by Austrian physician Sigmund Freud (and continued by others) devoted to the study of human psychological functioning and behavior:


Psychoanalysis

Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud

Freud's Chaise Lounge (also known as Freud Sofa)

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Psychological Repression

A psychological attempt by an individual to repel its own desires and impulses towards pleasurable instincts:

Psychological Repression (also Psychic Repression or simply Repression)

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Unconscious Mind

A part of the mind which gives rise to a collection of mental phenomena that manifest in a person's mind but which the person is not aware of at the time of their occurrence:


Unconscious Mind

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Monday, November 8, 2010

Khyber Pass

An important trade route between Central Asia and South Asia; a strategic military location, that is a mountain pass which links Pakistan and Afghanistan:

Khyber Pass


In Farsi: گذرگاه خیبر
In Pashto: د خیبر دره
In Urdu: دره خیبر

Rem:

Farsi or Persian is widely spoken in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and to some extent in Armenia, Iraq, Bahrain, and Oman.

Pashto also known as Afghani, is a member of the Iranian languages group which is spoken primarily by the Pashtun people in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Urdu is the national language and one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other is English), and an official language of five Indian states.

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Hub-and-Spoke

A system of connections arranged like a chariot wheel, in which all airlines traffic moves along connected to a major airport or center:

Hub-and-Spoke (also called as spoke-hub distribution paradigm, or hub-and-spoke distribution paradigm)

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Maser

A device that produces coherent electromagnetic waves through amplification by stimulated emission:

Maser (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation)

Rem:

Laser: Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation
Maser: Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation

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Sunday, November 7, 2010

Pharmacoepidemiology

The use and effects of drugs on large groups of people:


Pharmacoepidemiology

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Friday, November 5, 2010

Poi

A performance art, one of the traditional performing arts of the Māori people of New Zealand, in which a ball or balls suspended from a length of flexible material, usually a plaited cord, are held in the hand and swung in circular patterns:


Poi

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Māori

The indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand:


Māori (or Maori)

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Polynesia

A subregion of Oceania, comprising a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean:


Polynesia

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Cosmic Ray

Energetic particles, originating from outer space, which impinge on Earth's atmosphere:


Cosmic Ray
What are cosmic rays? (Read more ...)

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Dark Chocolate

A well-known brain food and brain booster which is also good for heart by lowering blood pressure and cholesterol:


Dark Chocolate

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Death by Overwork

Karoshi is a Japanese word which means:


Death by Overwork

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Saturday, October 30, 2010

Halloween

According to superstition, you will see your future spouse or a skull if you die before you get married if you stare into a mirror at midnight on:


Halloween
mp4 video format:
video
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flv video format:
video
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Halloween

Ahriman

A Persian word used in English which is the name of Zoroastrianism's conception of destructive spirit or evil:


Ahriman

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Kalmar Union

A series of personal unions which united the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden under a single monarch, though intermittently and with a population less than 3,000,000, from 1397 to 1523:


Kalmar Union (Kalmarunionen in Norwegian, Danish and Swedish)

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BTU

A unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules which is approximately the amount of energy needed to heat 1 pound of water for 1° Fahrenheit:


BTU (British Thermal Unit)

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Hogmanay

The Scots word for the last day of the year which is synonymous with the celebration of the New Year (Gregorian calendar) in the Scottish manner:


Hogmanay

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Pope Gregory XIII

The Gregorian calendar (also known as the Western calendar and the Christian calendar) was introduced by:


Pope Gregory XIII

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Hijab

The head covering worn by Muslim women:


Hijab (In Persian and Arabic: حجاب)

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Thursday, October 28, 2010

Sentiment Analysis

An area of natural language processing, computational linguistics and text mining which aims to determine the attitude of a speaker or a writer with respect to some topic:


Sentiment Analysis

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Monday, October 25, 2010

Adrian Smith

An American architect, one of the most recognized architects in the world, who has designed notable super tall skyscrapers such as the Burj Khalifa and Jin Mao Tower:



Adrian Smith (1944- )

Adrian Smith

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Burj Khalifa

The world's tallest building since 2010:



Burj Khalifa

Burj Khalifa
Burj Khalifa

It is a skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The official height of the tower, unveiled as Burj Khalifa, was announced as 828 metres.

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Sunday, October 24, 2010

Thermoplastic

A polymer that turns to a liquid when heated and freezes to a very glassy state when cooled:



Thermoplastic

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Anna Chapman

A Volgograd native Russian spy who while living in New York was arrested along with nine others on June 27, 2010, on suspicion of working for the Illegals Program spy ring:



Anna Chapman

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Anna Chapman

Russian spy Anna Chapman strips off for Maxim shoot

Russian spy Anna Chapman was revealed by others in June as a sleeper agent in the US. Now she has decided to reveal more of herself, as our picture shows.

She has stripped down to black lingerie for a photo spread in the Russian edition of Maxim, appearing on the cover of the November issue under the caption ‘For Your Eyes Only', a reference to the 1981 movie featuring British spy James Bond.

The magazine hit the shelves yesterday (read more here).

Anna Chapman, Russian Spy, Bets On New iPhone Poker App

Anna Chapman

Anna Chapman knows when to hold ‘em, fold ‘em, walk away and when to run with a new business venture.

ABCNews.com is reporting that the alleged Russian spy is coming out with an iPhone app so that you can play poker against her.

The application, Poker With Anna Chapman, at $1.99, allows players to take on the Russian sex symbol in either Texas Hold’em or Five Card Draw. There are prizes offered if the player is able to vanquish the virtual Chapman in the hand, says Poker News Daily (read more here).

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Illegals Program

A network of Russian sleeper agents under non-official cover whose investigation by FBI culminated in a prisoner swap between Russia and the United States in 2010:



Illegals Program

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Wolverine

The largest land-dwelling species of the weasel family in the genus Gulo:



Wolverine (also known as Skunk Bear, Quickhatch, Carcajou, Glutton, and Gulon)

Wolverine

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Agrologist

In Canada, an agronomist is called:



Agrologist
An agronomist is a scientist who specializes in utilizing plants for food, fuel, feed, and fiber.

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Saturday, October 23, 2010

Turbofan

A type of aircraft jet engine which provides thrust using a combination of a ducted fan and a jet exhaust nozzle:

Turbofan



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Constellation

An arbitrary formation of stars perceived as a figure or design:

Constellation

Note: In modern astronomy, an internationally defined area of the celestial sphere is a constellation.

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Puyi

The last Emperor of China:

Puyi (also written as P'U-I)
Puyi (1906-1967) was the twelfth and final member of the Qing Dynasty to rule over China proper (read more here).

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Friday, October 22, 2010

Madagascar

Malagasy Republic is the older name of:

Madagascar

Madagascar is an island country in the Indian Ocean close to the southeastern coast of Africa.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Terrible Lizard

The term dinosaur, coined in 1842, means:

Terrible Lizard

Pyrolysis

Thermochemical decomposition of organic material at elevated temperatures in the absence of oxygen:

Pyrolysis

Cellophane

A thin transparent sheet made of regenerated cellulose with low permeability to air, oils and bacteria:

Cellophane

Guangzhou

The capital and the largest city of Guangdong, a province of China, is:

Guangzhou (also known as Canton or Kwangchow)

Guangzhou (广州) is the third largest city in China.

Coulomb

An SI unit of electric charge which is approximately equal to the charge of 66*10^18 electrons:

Coulomb

Coulomb is named after French physicist, Charles-Augustin de Coulomb (1736-1806).

Sudan

The largest country in Africa:

Sudan

Rem: Sudan is also the largest country in the Arab world.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Digg

A social news website, started in 2004, for people to discover and share content from anywhere on the web which surfaces the best contents as voted on by its users:

Digg

Magic Square

An arrangement of n^2 numbers, usually distinct integers, in a square, such that the n numbers in all rows, all columns, and both diagonals sum to the same constant:

Magic Square


Friday, October 15, 2010

Canopus

The second brightest star in the night-time sky, after Sirius:

Canopus

Cherokee

The largest of the 563 federally recognized Native American tribes in the United States:

Cherokee (read more
here)

Metcalfe's Law

The law which states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system:

Metcalfe's Law

Reza Shah

In 20th centuray, Pahlavi dynasty was etablished in Iran by:

Reza Shah


Note: Reza Shah changed the country's name from Persia to Iran.

Reza Shah (Rezā Shāh) 1878 – 1944

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Flamboyant

A florid style of late Gothic architecture in vogue in France, Spain and Portugal during the 15th century:

Flamboyant

Flamboyant; Gothic architecture
Flamboyant Style (Church of Saint-Maclou, Rouen, France)

Cymbeline

A play by William Shakespeare based on the legends concerning the early Celtic British King Cunobelinus:

Cymbeline

Monday, October 11, 2010

Review

Review Items No. 341-360

341. The largest automaker in Europe:
Volkswagen
Volkswagen Group has been the largest automaker in Europe for a long time.

342. The deepest lake in the world:
Lake Baikal

343. The Eternal City is a nickname for the city of:
Rome

344. The boot firmware, designed to be the first code run by a PC when powered on:
BIOS
BIOS stands for Basic Input/Output System.

345. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by:
Arthur Conan Doyle

346. A large emplacement of igneous intrusive rock that forms from cooled magma deep in the earth's crust:
Batholith

347. Traditional Hawaiian dance:
Hula

348. The seventh and final book of the Harry Potter novels:
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

349. The capital city of the US state of Oregon:
Salem

350. The Big Store (1941) is a comedy film by the American family comedy act:
Marx Brothers

351. The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children written by:
C. S. Lewis

352. Malaria is naturally transmitted by the bite of female mosquitoes of the genus:
Anopheles

353. Super Mario World is a platform game developed and published by:
Nintendo

354. The professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania:
Pittsburgh Penguins

355. A city designated by the European Union for a period of one calendar year, giving it a chance to showcase its cultural life and development:
European Capital of Culture

356. The city considered to be the de facto capital of the European Union:
Brussels (Belgium)

357. The British hacker, facing extradition to the United States on charges of perpetrating the biggest military computer hack of all time:
Gary McKinnon

358. The acute contagious disease, especially of children marked by low-grade fever and formation of vesicles, caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV):
Chickenpox

359. The largest city and capital of Ireland:
Dublin

360. The Canadian-American comic book artist, best known for co-creating the character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel:
Joe Shuster

Review Items No. 321-340

321. The historical name used in the context of Ancient Rome in references to the region of Western Europe:
Gaul

322. The Caucasian Chalk Circle is a play by the German playwright:
Bertolt Brecht

323. The capital city of the US state of Connecticut:
Hartford

324. The largest peninsula:
Arabian Peninsula
The Arabian peninsula contains the world's largest reserves of oil.

325. The permanent memory built into computers:
ROM
ROM stands for Read Only Memory.

326. The fastest fish:
Sailfish

327. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom since 2007:
Gordon Brown

328. The Portrait of a Lady is a great novel by:
Henry James

329. The Portrait of a Lady is a great novel by:
Henry James

330. A North American of English heritage, origin or background is called:
Anglo-American

331. The Egyptian snake that was a symbol of royalty:
Asp

332. The South American camelid, widely used as a pack and meat animal:
Llama

333. Morning Star is the name given to the planet:
Venus

334. The chief god in Norse paganism and the ruler of Asgard:
Odin

335. Cain's mother was:
Eve
In the Hebrew Bible and Quran, Cain and Abel are the first and second sons of Adam and Eve.

336. The poetic name for Ireland due to its green countryside:
Emerald Isle

337. One of the major rivers of Europe, originating in Switzerland, running through the south-eastern corner of France:
Rhone

338. 2001 romantic comedy film, based on one of Marivaux's plays:
The Triumph of Love
Note 1:
The Triumph of Love is based on Marivaux's play Le Triomphe de l'amour (1732).
Note 2:
Pierre de Chamblain de Marivaux (1688 – 1763), commonly referred to as Marivaux, was a great French novelist and dramatist.

339. In Roman mythology, the goddess of the hunt was:
Diana

340. The capital and largest city of Sierra Leone:
Freetown
Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa.

Review Items No. 301-320

301. The river known as the sorrow of Bengal:

Damodar

302. The professional American football team, based in the New York metropolitan area, originally known as the New York Titans:

New York Jets

303. The baht is the currency of:

Thailand

304. The mausoleum located in Agra, India, built by one of the Mughal Emperors in memory of his favorite wife:
Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal

305. The German physicist who first demonstrated the existence of electromagnetic waves by building an apparatus to produce and detect VHF or UHF radio waves:

Heinrich Hertz

306. The founder of the Mongol Empire:

Genghis Khan

307. The gold coin used within the Persian Empire with very high gold quality, bearing the image of the Persian king or a great warrior armed with a bow and arrow:

Daric (Persian Daric)

308. Cambodia was formerly known as:

Kampuchea

309. The largest waterfall in the world:

Victoria Falls
Victoria Falls is a waterfall located in Africa between the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe.

310. X-ray is discovered by:

Wilhelm Röntgen

311. The official state security service of East Germany was:

Stasi

312. The westernmost city on the African mainland:

Dakar
Note: Dakar is the capital city of Senegal.

313. The large North American diving duck:

Canvasback

314. The fin located on the backs of whales, dolphins and some fish:

Dorsal

315. The mathematical constant whose value is the ratio of any circle's circumference to its diameter:

π (pi)

316. A shop or restaurant that primarily makes and sells pizzas is called:

Pizzeria

317. The organ system that passes nutrients, gases, hormones and blood cells to and from cells in the body:

Circulatory System

318. The common name for the currencies used in India, Sri Lanka, Burma, Nepal and Pakistan:

Rupee

319. The Matthew Bible was first published in 1537 by:

John Rogers
Note: By John Rogers under the pseudonym Thomas Matthew.

320. The longest river in Germany:

Rhine
The Rhine is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe.

Review Items No. 281-300

281. The French Revolution of 1830 is known as:

July Revolution

282. Canada's national animal:

Beaver

283. The country was previously called Siam:

Thailand

284. The most visited museum in the world:

The Louvre Museum

285. The separatist militant organization which fought to create an independent Tamil state in Sri Lanka:

Tamil Tigers

286. Braxy is an inflammatory disease in:

Sheep

287. The extreme or irrational fear of heights:

Acrophobia

288. The official demonym for a resident of the State of Indiana:

Hoosier

289. The Grand Canyon State is a nickname for:

Arizona

290. Spanish tennis player who was ranked World Number #1 from summer 2008 to summer 2009:

Rafael Nadal

291. The First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba:

Fidel Castro

292. The founder and the first President of the Republic of Turkey:

Atatürk (Mustafa Kemal Atatürk)

293. The Chancellor of Germany since 2005:

Angela Merkel

294. Twilight is a series of four vampire-based fantasy romance novels by American author:

Stephenie Meyer

295. American actress, singer, dancer, fashion designer and television producer, who is the richest person of Latin American descent in Hollywood (according to Forbes):

Jennifer Lopez

296. Before 1935, Iran was known internationally as:

Persia

297. The geometric theory of gravitation published by Albert Einstein in 1915:

General Relativity

298. 1965 musical film, won 5 Oscars, directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer:

The Sound of Music

299. The famous novel sequence in ten volumes by Romain Rolland:

Jean-Christophe

300. 2004 Summer Olympics was held in:

Athens, Greece

Review Items No. 261-280

261. The search engine Microsoft launched in 2009:

Bing.com

262. The city named as the Host City for the 2016 Olympic Games:

Rio de Janeiro

263. The UK airline which went in to administration in 2009, with the cancellation of all scheduled flights:

Flyglobespan

264. Mount Ararat is a snow-capped, dormant volcanic cone, with two peaks, in:

Turkey

265. The 1996 film, directed by Danny Boyle, based on and with the same name as the first novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh:

Trainspotting

266. The mountain is said to hold magical powers in the Shahnameh:

Mount Damavand
The first verse of this poem reads:
"Oh white demon with feet in chains
Oh terrestrial dome, Oh Mount Damāvand"
Mount Damāvand, also known as Donbavand, a potentially active volcano and the highest peak in Iran, has a special place in

Persian mythology and folklore. Located in the middle Alborz Range, it is the highest point in the Middle East and the highest volcano in all of

Asia
.



267. The longest and also the widest single nerve in the human body:

Sciatic nerve

268. The second-closest planet to the Sun:

Venus
Remember: Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun.

269. The country known as Cockpit of Europe:

Belgium

270. Since the Middle Ages, Monaco has been ruled by:

House of Grimaldi

271. The practice of eating earthy or soil-like substances such as clay and chalk, in order to obtain essential nutrients such as sulfur and phosphorus from

the soil, is called:

Geophagy

272. The instrument used for measuring relative humidity:

Hygrometer

273. The 1959 epic film starring Charlton Heston which won 11 Oscars:

Ben-Hur (or Benhur)

274. The name of Dorothy Gale's dog in The Wizard of Oz:
Toto

275. A young turkey:
Poult

276. The capital of India:
New Delhi

277. The derogatory term for television:
Idiot Box

278. The 2012 Summer Olympic Games are due to take place in:
London (United Kingdom)
Note: The 2012 Summer Olympic Games are officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad.

279. The nickname of the US state of Florida that is also used for New Mexico, California and South Dakota:
Sunshine State

280. The solid form of carbon dioxide:
Dry Ice
Dry ice is sometimes referred to as Cardice or as card ice.

Review Items No. 241-260

241. Alabama is unofficially nicknamed as:
Yellowhammer State

242. The "http" people type at the beginning of any site's address stands for:
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol

243. The author of Adventures of Sherlock Holmes:
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

244. Bacteria was discovered by:
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

245. The Land of Maple Leaf:
Canada

246. Checkmate is a ballet with music written by the British composer:
Arthur Bliss

247. The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex is a book on evolutionary theory by:
Charles Darwin

248. The official currency of Afghanistan:
Afghani

249. The inventor of the petrol powered automobile (gasoline-powered automobile):
Karl Friedrich Benz

250. At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the discipline started even before the official opening ceremony was:
Football (Soccer)

251. The ocean that covers approximately one-fifth of the Earth's surface and about one-quarter of the Earth's water surface area:
Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest oceanic divisions of the world.

252. The island known as the Island of Pearls:
Manihiki

253. The White City is:
Belgrade
Belgrade is the capital and largest city of Serbia. Its name in Serbian translates to White City.

254. The world's tallest currently-active geyser:
Steamboat GeyserSteamboat Geyser is in Yellowstone National Park's Norris Geyser Basin. During major eruptions, water may be thrown more than 300 feet (90m) into the air.

255. 2001: A Space Odyssey is written by:
Arthur C. Clarke

256. The pop music group formed in Sweden in 1970, consisting of Anni-Frid Lyngstad (Frida), Björn Ulvaeus, Benny Andersson (the "B-boys") and Agnetha Fältskog (Anna):

ABBA

257. The currency of Denmark:
Krone (the cognate of "Crown")

258. The bird with the largest wingspans of any extant birds:
Albatross

259. The professional basketball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States:
Timberwolves (Minnesota Timberwolves)

260. Harry Potter is a series of seven fantasy novels written by British author:
J. K. Rowling
J. K. Rowling

Review Items No. 221-240

221. The stethoscope was invented in France in 1816 by:
Rene Theoplhie Laennec

222. The Land of the Golden Fleece is:
Colchis
The land of the Golden Fleece is a legendary country, but the Greeks were impressed by the Colchis region of Georgia (in ancient geography, Colchis or Kolkhis was an ancient Georgian

state kingdom and region).

223. Japanese geometrical puzzles in Euclidean geometry on wooden tablets are:
Sangaku

224. The city of Chicago is widely recognized as:
Windy City

225. The lady who won the Miss Universe 2004 crown is:
Jennifer Hawkins

226. A linear-shaped lowland between highlands or mountain ranges, created by tensional forces that are strong enough to cause the plate to split apart, is called:
Rift

Valley


227. The biggest state of US is:
Alaska

228. The most popular indoor sport in US is:
Basketball

229. A closed or exclusive set of information services provided for users is called:
Walled Garden

230. In December 2009, TimeWarner split from:
AOL

231. The city known as Holy Land is:
Jerusalem

232. One of the top wine regions in the United States and the world, located in Napa County, California, USA:
Napa Valley

233. The broad prehistoric time period during which humans widely used stone for toolmaking is:
Stone Age

234. A type of beer brewed from malted barley using a top-fermenting brewers' yeast:
Ale

235. An alternative name for measles in English-speaking countries is:
Rubeola

236. The huge bell on display on the grounds of the Moscow Kremlin (the largest bell in existence):
Tsar Bell

237. The great movie developed by director/star Kevin Costner over five years, high production values, won 7 Academy Awards and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture -

Drama:
Dances with Wolves

238. Currently the World No. 1 American professional golfer and the highest-paid professional athlete in 2008 is:
Tiger Woods
Full name Eldrick Tont Woods
Nickname Tiger

239. The capital of the People's Republic of China is:
Beijing

240. The city where the first Modern Olympics was held:
Athens

Review Items No. 201-220

201. The world's largest furniture retailer is:

IKEA

202. The cracker-like flat bread made of white plain flour and water is called:

Matzo (also Matzah, Matzoh or Matsah)



203. The American punk rock band from Albany, California and formed in 1991 is:

Rancid

204. The main founder of Facebook is:
Mark Zuckerberg
Mark Zuckerberg founded Facebook with his college roommates and fellow computer science students Eduardo Saverin, Dustin Moskovitz and Chris Hughes.
Zuckerberg serves as Facebook's CEO.

205. The highest region on earth is:

Tibet
With an average elevation of 4,900 metres (16,000 ft), Tibet is the highest region on earth. It is referred to as the roof of the world.

206. The first Chinese leader who grew up in the aftermath of the revolution that established communism in 1949 is:

Hu JintaoHu Jintao is the President of the People's Republic of China since 2003.
He is also the Paramount Leader of China, holding the titles of General Secretary of the Communist Party of China.

207. The core of the Sun has a temperature of:

14,000,000 °C
The core of the Sun has a temperature of close to 13,600,000 Kelvin ([Kelvin] = [°C] + 273.15); roughly 14,000,000 °C or 14,000,000 Kelvin.

208. The Greatest Wrestler of the 20th Century in Freestyle is:
Alexander Medved
Alexander Medved is also considered by some to be the best freestyle wrestler of all time.

209. The densest natural element is:
Osmium
The density of osmium is 22.61 g/cm3, slightly greater than that of iridium, the second densest element.

210. The Internet and multimedia enabled smartphone designed and marketed by Apple Inc. is:
iPhone

211. The son of Zeus and Leto is:
ApolloIn Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo is one of the most important the Olympian deities.

212. The land of white elephant is:
Thailand

213. A set of aims and ideas that directs one's goals and actions and forms the basis of a political, economic or other systemis is called:
Ideology

214. Awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature:
Herta Müller

215. The river that was known as the River of Sorrows is:
Damodar River

216. The branch of health care devoted to the study, diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the foot, ankle and lower leg is:

Podiatry

217. The smallest extant bird species is:
Bee Hummingbird

218. The Land of the Morning Calm is:
Korea

219. The only volcano on the European mainland to have erupted within the last hundred years is:
Vesuvius (east of Naples, Italy)

220. The sport term pertaining to winning of all the matches, championships, etc. in a group of sport matches is:
Grand Slam
The best known Grand Slams are those in Tennis (Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon and US Open), Golf (US Open, British Open, Masters and PGA) and Rugby (Six Nations Championship).




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Review Items No. 181-200

181. An acid derived from one or more inorganic compounds is called:

Mineral Acid
Commonly used mineral acids are nitric acid, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric.

182. The most popular mainframe operating system is:

z/OS

183. MVS stands for:

Multiple Virtual Storage

Multiple Virtual Storage, commonly called MVS, developed by IBM, was the most commonly used operating system on the System/370 and System/390 IBM mainframe

computers. First released in 1974, MVS had been renamed multiple times, first to MVS/XA, next to MVS/ESA, then to OS/390 and

finally to z/OS .

184. The largest desert in North America, located in the western United States is:

Great Basin Desert

185. The biggest coffee producers in the world is:

Brazil

186. The new crew launch vehicle being developed by NASA is:

Ares I
In October 28, 2009, Ares I-X was successfully launched. Ares I-X was the first test flight in the Ares I program.

187. The country known as "country of copper" is:

Zambia

188. The coldest place on Earth is:

Antarctica

189. COBOL, one of the oldest programming languages, was initially created by:

Grace Hopper

Grace Hopper (1906 – 1992)

190. The chain of islands in the Caribbean including ABC islands and Venezuelan archipelago is called:

Leeward Antilles

191. Vienna (local name Österreich) is the capital and also one of the nine states of:

Austria


Flag of Austria

192. The only animals other than humans that have been shown to transmit identity information independent of the caller’s voice or location are:

Dolphins

193. The nuclear reactor accident, occurred on 26 April 1986 in Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union) was:

Chernobyl Disaster

194. The animal, commonly known as the American Buffalo (although "Buffalo" is somewhat of a misnomer for this animal), which were hunted almost to extinction in the 19th century is:

American Bison

195. Any period marked by a greatly increased birth rate is called:

Baby Boom

196. The river that runs through Fort Benning (one of the largest military installations in the world) is:

Chattahoochee River

197. The first country to pursue Karl Marx's dream of a workers' state was:

Russia

198. Samuel Morse inaugurated his first telegraph line between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore in:

1844

199. The 1982 American science fiction film, directed by Ridley Scott and starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer and Sean Young is:

Blade Runner
Blade Runner was voted the sixth best science fiction film ever made as part of the AFI's 10 Top 10.

200. A form of jet engine that cannot produce thrust at zero airspeed and thus cannot move an aircraft from a standstill is:

Ramjet
A ramjet, also called a stovepipe jet, is a form of jet engine using the engine's forward motion to compress incoming air, without a rotary compressor.

Review Items No. 161-180

161. War and Peace, considered as one of the world's greatest novels, was written by:

Leo Tolstoy

162. Citizen Kane, considered as one of the world's greatest movies ever made, was directed and produced by:

Orson Welles

163. C++ (pronounced "C plus plus"), a general-purpose programming language, was developed by:

Bjarne Stroustrup


Bjarne Stroustrup

164. The capital, the largest city and the largest port of Azerbaijan (formally the Republic of Azerbaijan) is:

Baku

165. In 1973, the Cell Phone was invented by:


Martin Cooper


166. The longest river in Asia is:

Yangtze River
The Yangtze River is the longest river in China and Asia and the third-longest in the world, after the Nile and the Amazon.

167. The currency unit of Belarus, Russia and Transnistria is:

Ruble (or Rouble)

168. The most dangerous animal which is responsible for the most human deaths is:

Mosquito

169. The national currency used in China is:

Yuan

170. A Dance to the Music of Time is a twelve-volume cycle of novels by:

Anthony Powell

171. In 2006, No. 5, 1948 was sold for $140,000,000; No. 5, 1948 is a painting by:

Jackson Pollock

172. Saving Private Ryan, a 1998 American war film set during the invasion of Normandy in World War II, was directed by:

Steven Spielberg

173. The third President of the United States (1801–1809) and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence is:

Thomas Jefferson
Reminder:
The First US President: George Washington
The Second US President: John Adams

174. One of the top ever French soccer players, manager and the current president of UEFA is:

Michel Platini

175. The highest mountain peak in the US and also in North America is:

Mount McKinley (or Denali)

176. The capital of Bangladesh is:
Dhaka
Dhaka was formerly known as Dacca and Jahangir Nagar, under Mughal rule.

177. The third most populated country in the world is:

United States
Remember:
The first and the second most populated countries in the world are China and India, respectively.
178. From the 8th century BC to the 5th century AD, the Olympic Games were held in:

Olympia (in Greece)

179. The last messages from the God, the creator of all creatures, are written in:
Quran

180. The prophet who the God, the creator of all creatures, spoke with him was:

Moses

Review Items 141-160

141. In zoology, the biological order of mammals that includes monkeys, apes and man is:

Primate

142. The sport involving four and sometimes up to six motorcycle riders competing over four anti-clockwise laps of an oval circuit is called:

Speedway

143. The inventor of paper were:

Ancient Chinese

144. The second President of the United States was:

John Adams
John Adams (1735–1826) was an American politician and the second President of the United States (1797–1801), after being the first Vice President (1789–1797) for two terms. He is

regarded as one of the most influential Founding Fathers of the United States.

John Adams

145. U.S. President George H. W. Bush said, "For me, Magic is a hero, a hero for anyone who loves sports." In this quote Magic is:

Earvin Johnson (Earvin "Magic" Johnson Jr.)
Earvin Johnson (1959-) is a retired American professional basketball player who played point guard for the Los Angeles Lakers of the NBA.

146. Blowin' in the Wind is a song written by:

Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan, born Robert Allen Zimmerman in 1941, is an American singer-songwriter, musician, painter, poet and

latter-day disc jockey who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades.

147. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Notre-Dame de Paris) is written by:

Victor HugoVictor Hugo is sometimes identified as the greatest French poet.

148. The actress who began acting in commercials at 3 years old and her performance received international acclaim and her second Academy Award for Best Actress in

1991 is:

Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster is the first actress to receive two Oscars before the age of 30.

149. Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city of:

Argentina

150. The monument on the border between Argentina and Chile as a celebration of the peaceful resolution of the border dispute between the two countries is:

Christ the Redeemer of the Andes

151. The capital of the US state of California is:

Sacramento

152. D-Town and BIG D are nicknames for the US city of:
Dallas

153. In 1945, the conference for the purpose of discussing Europe's postwar reorganization was:

Yalta Conference

154. A closed plane figure bounded by straight sides is called:

Polygon

155. Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author:

Thomas Harris

156. Canberra is the capital city of:

Australia

157. The Galileo Galilei International Airport is located in the city of:

Pisa

(Italy)

158. The largest state of the US is:

Alaska

159. The country with the largest national economy in the world is:

The United States of America

160. The violence taking place in Darfur, Sudan began in 2003 is referred by:

The Darfur Conflict

Review Items 121-140

121. In tennis, the score that comes after deuce is:

Advantage

122. The Australian chicken breed, a large, soft-feathered and good egg-layer bird, is:

Australorp

123. The capital and the most populous city of the US state of Arkansas is:

Little Rock

124. The southernmost point of Asia is:

Pamana Island (Indonesia)

125. The Brothers Karamazov, a passionate philosophical novel, is written by:

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

126. In 1963, John F Kennedy assassinated in the city of:

Dallas (Texas)

127. The Scottish mathematician who invented logarithms was:

John Napier

128. The capital and largest city of Angola is:

Luanda

129. The Japanese call their country as:

Nippon

130. The city known as the City of Canals is:

Venice

131. The inventors of the hot air balloon are:

Montgolfier Brothers

132. The world’s largest dry desert is:

Sahara

133. Bride of Frankenstein, a 1935 horror film, was directed by:

James Whale

134. The animal that makes the loudest sound in the world is:

Blue Whale

135. The capital and largest city of the US state of Arizona is:

Phoenix

136. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children's novel written by:

L. Frank Baum

137. The series of trials from 1945 to 1946 for the prosecution of prominent members of the political, military and economic leadership of Nazi Germany after its defeat in

World War II was:

The Nuremberg Trials

138. The capital and largest city of Armenia is:

Yerevan
Yerevan is sometimes written as Erevan, Erewan, Ayrivan and Erivan.

139. The Hindu god of love, desire and lust is:

Kama

140. The capital of Alaska is:
Juneau

Review Items 101-120

101. The first President of the United States of America was:

George Washington
102. The study of horses is called:

Hippology

103. The animated cartoon character who appeared in theatrical short films produced by the Walter Lantz animation studio is:

Woody Woodpecker

104. In 2003, The Da Vinci Code, a mystery-detective fiction novel, was written by:

Dan Brown

105. The capital of Alabama is:

Montgomery

106. The pastime which involves throwing a stone across a body of water in such a way that it bounces off the surface of the water is called:

Stone Skipping
Stone Skipping is also called Stone Skimming, Stone Skiting and Ducks and Drakes in the UK and Stone Skiffing in Ireland.

107. The first woman who hold a seat in the British parliament was:

Lady Nancy Astor

108. The capital and largest city of the Republic of Albania is:
Tirana

109. The capital and largest city of Algeria is:

Algiers

110. The jet engine was invented by:

Frank Whittle

111. The comedy of The Taming of the Shrew was written by:

William Shakespeare

112. The measuring instrument used to measure the electric current in a circuit is:

Ammeter
Electric currents are measured in amperes (A).

113. The sea that lies between Africa and Asia is:

The Red Sea

114. Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by:
Michael Curtiz

Michael Curtiz

Michael Curtiz (1886-1962) was a Hungarian-American filmmaker. He directed more than 150 movies such as The Adventures of Robin Hood, Casablanca and

White Christmas.

115. The mixed breed dog, a hybrid cross between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle is:

Goldendoodle

116. The first Zoroastrian Persian Emperor who respected the customs and religions of the lands he conquered was:

Cyrus the Great
117. The first American to orbit the Earth is:

John Glenn

118. The author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion is:

J. R. R. Tolkien

119. The capital and largest city of Andorra, a small country in southwestern Europe, is:

Andorra la Vella

120. The largest lake in Alaska is:

Iliamna Lake or Lake Iliamna




Copyright ©2010 Improve Your General Knowledge in Leisure Time! All rights reserved.

版权所有© 2010 提高你的 一般知识 在 闲暇时间! 保留所有权利。

حقوق الطبع والنشر © 2010 تحسين معرفتك العامة في وقت الفراغ! جميع الحقوق محفوظة.

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Copyright © 2010 Améliorez vos connaissances générales dans le temps libre! Tous droits réservés.

Copyright © 2010 Erhöhen Sie Ihr Allgemeinwissen in der Freizeit! Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

זכויות יוצרים © 2010 לשפר את הידע הכללי שלך ב בשעות הפנאי! כל הזכויות שמורות.

कॉपीराइट © 2010 अपने ख़ाली समय में सामान्य ज्ञान में सुधार! सभी अधिकार सुरक्षित.

Copyright © 2010 Meningkatkan Pengetahuan Umum Anda dalam Time Kenyamanan! All rights reserved.

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Review Items 81-100

81. The largest eyes of any land mammal belong to:

Horse
Horses have the largest eyes of any land mammal and as their eyes are positioned on the sides of their heads, they have a range of vision of more than 350°.

82. In Earth’s history, the period by its end, most dinosaurs become extinct was:

Triassic
The Triassic is a geologic period that extends from about 251 to 199 million years ago. Both the start and end of the Triassic are marked by major extinction events.

83. A series of water waves that is caused when a large volume of a body of water, such as an ocean, is rapidly displaced is named:

Tsunami

84. The component added to some jet engines, primarily those on military supersonic aircraft, to provide a temporary increase in thrust, both for supersonic flight and for takeoff is:

Afterburner

85. The most common mammal in the world is:

Rat

86. The Spanish archipelago which forms one of the Spanish Autonomous Communities and an Outermost Region of the European Union is:

The Canary Islands

87. Any of several carnivorous mammals of the weasel family is called:

Polecat

88. The most popular spice in the world is:

Pepper

89. The name for a baby after eight weeks is:

Fetus

90. The hybrid cross between a male lion and a female tigre is:

Liger

Liger

91. The song with music by Elton John and lyrics by Bernie Taupin, originally written in 1973, in honor of Marilyn Monroe, is:

Candle in the Wind

92. The inferior maxillary bone which forms the lower jaw and holds the lower teeth in place is:

Mandible

93. The collection of freshwater lakes located in eastern North America, on the Canada – United States border is named:

The Great Lakes

94. The generic German term for an air force, also the name of the German Airforce in World War II, is:

Luftwaffe

95. The longest novel ever written is:

Artamène, or Cyrus the Great

Artamène, or Cyrus the Great is a novel in ten volumes by siblings Madeleine and Georges de Scudéry. At over 2,100,000 words, it is considered the longest novel ever written, with the

possible exception of Henry Darger's unpublished The Story of the Vivian Girls.

96. Charles Darwin's book, published 24 November 1859, a seminal work of scientific literature considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology, is:

On the Origin of Species

97. The abbreviation E.G. stands for:

Exempli Gratia or For Example

98. Robinson Crusoe is a novel by:

Daniel Defoe

99. The capital of Afghanistan is:

Kabul

100. Africa's largest country is:

Sudan
Review Items No. 61-80

61. The device in which a moving fluid drives a wheel or motor is:
Turbine

62. The strait between the North and South Islands of New Zealand is:
Cook Strait
Cook Strait is the strait between the North and South Islands of New Zealand. It connects the Tasman Sea on the west with the South Pacific Ocean on the east.

63. Theoretical temperature corresponds to minus 273.15 degrees on the Celsius scale is:
Absolute Zero

64. A kind of small, flat-baked bread product that is named from Latin via Middle French meaning "cooked twice" is:
Biscuit

65. The language that has more native speakers than any other language is:
Mandarin

66. The smallpox vaccine was discovered by:
Edward Jenner

67. The romantic drama and the only novel written by Margaret Mitchell is:
Gone with the Wind

68. The largest planet within the Solar System is:
Jupiter

69. The Godfather films were directed by:
Francis Ford Coppola


Francis Ford

Coppola

70. The largest continent in area is:

Asia


71. The name of Roman god meaning "Shining Father", in Latin is:

Jupiter

72. The seven-a-side ball game that is played in a swimming pool is:

Water polo

73. The most populous city of the world is:

Tokyo

74. The animal that is found in coastal regions of eastern and southern Australia and its name means "doesn't drink" is:

Koala

75. The smallest planet in the Solar System is:

Mercury

76. The largest kind of shark is:

Whale Shark

77. The longest bone in human body is:

Femur
In human anatomy, the femur is the longest and largest bone.

78. The show Sex and the City is set in:

New York City

79. The pharaoh of Egypt who killed herself by inducing an asp to bite her was:

Cleopatra

80. The author of David Copperfield is:

Charles Dickens

Review Items No. 41-60

41. All Saints' Day, often shortened to All Saints, is a feast celebrated on:

November 1

42. The fictional character in the novel Don Quixote written by Spanish author Cervantes, who was Don Quixote’s squire is:

Sancho Panza

43. The Canadian city hosted the 1976 Olympics is:

Montreal

44. The substance released by body tissues in allergic reactions is:

Histamine

45. Golf was originated in:

Scotland

46. The smallest ocean in the world is:

The Arctic Ocean

47. A full moon that is not timed to the regular monthly pattern is called:

Blue Moon
A blue moon is a full moon that is not timed to the regular monthly pattern; most years have twelve full moons which occur approximately monthly, but in addition to those twelve full lunar

cycles, each calendar year contains an excess of roughly eleven days. The extra days accumulate, so that every two or three years (on average about every 2.7154 years) there is an

extra full moon. The extra moon is called a "blue moon."

48. Chess was invented in:

India

49. The Iliad and the Odyssey was written by:

Homer

50. The first complete word in the dictionary is:

Aardvark

51. The author of Tarzan is:

Burroughs
Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875 – 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan although he produced works in many genres.

52. The world's largest lake is:
The Caspian Sea

53. The most common element on the Earth is:
Hydrogen

54. The region of West Africa which is now the nation of Ghana was:

The Gold Coast

55. The longest river in the world is:

The Nile

56. Land of the Rising Sun is:

Japan


57. The longest highway in the world is:

The Trans-Canada Highway

58. Australia and New Zealand are seperated by:

The Tasman Sea

59. The train is a vehicle of transportation, which was invented in 1822 by an English inventor named:

George Stephenson

60. Relative to size, the strongest muscle in the body is:

Tongue
Review Items No. 21-40

21. The tallest statue in the world is:

The Spring Temple Buddha



The Spring Temple Buddha is a statue depicting Vairocana Buddha located in Henan, China (height: 128m / 420ft).
22. Because of its abundance of

orchards and hop gardens, Kent is widely known as:
The Garden of England
(Kent is a county in southeast England.)
23. What was the name of the first computer game?

Tennis for Two
24. The Roman name for Portugal was:

Lusitania
(Lusitania was an ancient Roman province including approximately all of modern Portugal south of the Douro river, and part of modern Spain.)

25. The first official telephone call to the moon was made by:
Richard Nixon
Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States (1969–1974).

26. The Scottish city, Aberdeen, is known as:

The Granite City
Aberdeen is Scotland's third most populous city. Nicknames include the Granite City, the Grey City and the Silver City with the Golden Sands.

27. The largest island in Canada is:

Baffin Island
It is the largest island in Canada and the fifth largest island in the world.

28. The person who first succeeded in transmitting a radio signala cross the Atlantic Ocean was:
Marconi
Marchese Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937) was an Italian inventor.
29. Burkina Faso was formerly called:
The Republic of Upper Volta
Burkina Faso, formerly called the Republic of Upper Volta, it was renamed on August 4, 1984, by President Thomas Sankara to mean "the land of upright people" in Moré and Dioula, the

major native languages of the country. Literally, "Burkina" may be translated, "men of integrity," from the Moré language, and "Faso" means "father's house" in Dioula.


Flag of Burkina Faso
30. In the Old Testament, the elder brother of Moses is:

Aaron31. The longest river in Europe is:

The Volga
The Volga is the largest river in Europe in terms of length, discharge, and watershed. It flows through the western part of Russia and is widely viewed as the national river of Russia.

32. The instrument in an aircraft that measures height above sea level is:

Altimeter
An altimeter is an instrument used to measure the altitude of an object above a fixed level. The measurement of altitude is called altimetry, which is related to the term bathymetry, the

measurement of depth underwater.

Altimeter

33. A stellar explosion is called:

Supernova
It is the end time situation of a star which is going to be exploded. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before

fading from view over several weeks or months. During this short interval, a supernova can radiate as much energy as the Sun could emit over its life span.34. Stocks or a financial market

of a group of securities in which prices are rising or are expected to rise are called:

Bull Market

35. The abnormal fear of spiders and other arachnids is called:

Arachnophobia

36. The bird that is used as the sign of peace is:

Dove

37. The fastest animal on earth is:

Peregrine FalconIt can reach speeds over 322 km/h (200 mph) in a dive, making it the fastest animal in the world.

Peregrine Falcon

38. The basic form of transport; a frame for restraining horses, used by Native Americans is:

Travois

39. The other word for an alligator pear is:

Avocado

Avocado/Alligator pear

40. The world’s deepest ocean is:

Pacific Ocean
Review Items No. 1-20

1. The sculptor of the statue of Liberty was:

Frederic Auguste Bartholdi

2. Brightest star as seen from the Earth:

Sirius (also known as Dog Star)

3. Inventor of dynamite:

Alfred B. Nobel
4. The god of love in Greek myth:

Aphrodite (Aphrodite is the goddess of love, known as Venus to the Romans.)

5. The largest sea in the world:

South China Sea

6. The world's oldest known city:

Damascus
7. The lowest point on earth is:

The coastal area of Dead sea

8. The first explorer to reach the South Pole was:

Ronald Amundson
9. The country known as the land of the midnight sun is:

Norway

10. The youngest President of the USA:

Theodore Roosevelt

11. A form of government in which the head of state is not a monarch and the people have an contribution to its government:

Republic

12. Nearest star to the Earth (other than the Sun):

Proxima Centauri

13. The author of Alice in Wonderland:

Lewis Carroll


14. It is now believed that dinosaurs became extinct because of:
A Meteorite (A large meteorite is thought to have collided with the earth.)
15. Charles Darwin began developing his theory of evolution while voyaging on a ship named:

The Beagle

16. A robot that is designed to look and act like a human is called:

Android

17. The largest museum in the world is:
The American Museum of Natural History
18. The country known as the Land of Cakes is:

Scotland

19. The actor who is considered as the biggest cowboy star of silent movies is:

Tom Mix

20. Coal is known as:

Black Diamond



Copyright ©2010 Improve Your General Knowledge in Leisure Time! All rights reserved.

版权所有© 2010 提高你的 一般知识 在 闲暇时间! 保留所有权利。

حقوق الطبع والنشر © 2010 تحسين معرفتك العامة في وقت الفراغ! جميع الحقوق محفوظة.

Copyright © 2010 Forbedre din generelle viden i fritiden! Alle rettigheder forbeholdt.

Copyright © 2010 Verbeter uw algemene kennis in de vrije tijd! Alle rechten voorbehouden.

Copyright © 2010 Paranna yleisesti tiedossa Vapaa-aika! Kaikki oikeudet pidätetään.

Copyright © 2010 Améliorez vos connaissances générales dans le temps libre! Tous droits réservés.

Copyright © 2010 Erhöhen Sie Ihr Allgemeinwissen in der Freizeit! Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

זכויות יוצרים © 2010 לשפר את הידע הכללי שלך ב בשעות הפנאי! כל הזכויות שמורות.

कॉपीराइट © 2010 अपने ख़ाली समय में सामान्य ज्ञान में सुधार! सभी अधिकार सुरक्षित.

Copyright © 2010 Meningkatkan Pengetahuan Umum Anda dalam Time Kenyamanan! All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2010 migliorare le vostre conoscenze generali nel tempo libero! Tutti i diritti riservati.

著作権© 2010年の余暇時間のあなたの一般的な知識を向上させる!すべての権利を保有。

저작권 © 2010 여가 시간에 귀하의 일반적인 지식을 향상! 모든 권리 보유.

Copyright © MMX, adquirere in genere rerum otium! All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2010 forbedre din generelle kunnskap i Fritid! Alle rettigheter reservert.

Copyright © 2010 Улучшение свои знания в свободное время! Все права защищены.

Copyright © 2010 Mejorar su conocimiento general en el tiempo libre! Todos los derechos reservados.

Copyright © 2010 Förbättra din allmänbildning på fritiden! Alla rättigheter reserverade.

Copyright © 2010 Serbest Zaman Your Genel Bilgi geliştirin! Tüm hakları saklıdır.